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History CFPs for RSA 2018 New Orleans
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This blog is for CFPs for sessions in history for RSA 2018 New Orleans. Members may post CFPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CFP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CFP. Make sure the CFP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CFP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CFP to submit a paper proposal. CFPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CFPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: Historiography  Renaissance  early modern  art  court culture  gender  identity  material culture  Materiality  rhetoric  technologies  women  art history  bodies  body  cartography  Classical Reception  Devotion  Diasporas  early modern Spain  Eschatology  family  geography  global empires  Iberia  Italy  Literature  maps  medicine  memory 

Self-Fashioning and Re-fashioning the Renaissance

Posted By Imogen Tedbury, 10 hours ago

Every major artistic, political, and ecclesiastical figure of the Renaissance consciously manipulated their public image, intentionally fashioning how diverse audiences in different contexts would perceive them. The creation of these personae rendered both identifying features and historical narratives malleable. This practice often extended beyond the self, with lineages traced to fantastic origins, remembered ancestors glorified through manipulated memory, and the narrative of historical events rewritten. Since the Renaissance, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century scholarship has created new mythologies around these same Renaissance figures, sometimes derived from their original personae but often re-fashioned from more recent conceptions of history, patronage, art, or literature. In some instances, Renaissance self-fashioning has become obscured by the re-fashioned mythologies of scholarship.

At forty years’ distance from Stephen Greenblatt’s Renaissance Self-Fashioning and in light of recent research re-examining the reception of Renaissance art in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this panel seeks to interrogate the relationship between Renaissance and modern mythologies. It aims to reconsider present-day conceptions of major artistic, political, and ecclesiastical individuals based on (or contrasting with) the crafting of identity in the Renaissance period, alongside mythologies now recognized as modern lore. We welcome proposals that explore the Renaissance self-fashioning and modern re-fashioning of figures from 1300-1700 throughout Europe. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

 

       Case studies and Comparisons: The reassessment of a Renaissance figure (artistic, political, ecclesiastical, etc.) and their contemporary or modern mythology; a discussion of an understudied individual who has remained overlooked; the examination of a figure who has had a cyclical resurgence of scholarship over the past centuries

       Reception Networks: The investigation of the relationship between patron, artist/writer, public, and/or scholar in the development of both modern and Renaissance myths

       Sources and Resources: Parallels and/or disjunctions between the art, literature, etc. that contributed to a figure's public image, the archival sources that fueled nineteenth or twentieth-century scholarship, and/or contemporary conceptions of an individual, including political, geographical, and personal agendas

Papers are welcome from multiple fields (art history, history, literature, sociology, etc.). Please send 150-word abstracts and a brief CV (see RSA guidelines here) to Alexander J. Noelle (alexander.noelle@courtauld.ac.uk) and Imogen Tedbury (imogen.tedbury@courtauld.ac.uk) by Sunday 4th June 2017.

Tags:  early modern  Historiography  identity  private/public  Renaissance  representation  self-conception  self-fashioning 

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The Far North in the Early Modern Imagination

Posted By Kjell Wangensteen, Monday, May 22, 2017

Since at least the time of Hesiod, the land of the far north has been described in wondrous, exotic, and even paradisiacal terms.  The Hyperboreans—those living “beyond the north wind”—were extolled by Pindar as an especially peaceful and long-lived race.  In his famous Historia de Gentibus Septentrionalibus (History of the Northern Peoples), printed in Rome in 1555, the exiled Swedish archbishop Olaus Magnus (1490-1557) described his homeland as a place of noble warriors, strange myths, fantastic beasts, and extraordinary natural phenomena.  Magnus’s account was reprinted in numerous editions and translated into six languages, stoking interest throughout Europe in the far north and its inhabitants.  Well into the seventeenth century, this fascination manifested in nearly all aspects of European culture, from politics and literature to art and the natural sciences. 

This session invites papers from a variety of disciplines that investigate and interpret the early modern understanding of the far north (broadly defined), from the sixteenth century through the beginning of the eighteenth.  Topics may include travel accounts to northern climes and their reception, contemporary visual depictions of the lands and people of the far north, the discovery and publication of rune stones and other pre-Christian archaeological finds, historical claims to Gothic lineage and their use for political ends, the construction of patriotic narratives and mythologies, and the study, depiction, and analysis of northern flora and fauna.

Please email paper proposals, including a title and abstract of approximately 150 words, as well as a list of keywords, a current C.V. and a short bio (300-word maximum) to Kjell Wangensteen (kwangens@princeton.edu) by Saturday, June 3.

Tags:  Art History  History  History of Science  landscape  Northern Europe  Scandinavia  Travel Accounts 

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Priests, Spies, and Informants

Posted By Amanda L. Scott, Saturday, May 20, 2017
Updated: Saturday, May 20, 2017

Studies of networks and the concept of go-betweens have provided many useful insights into examining the ways in which people traversed unfamiliar geographies, bridged cultural divides, and moved between local communities and the early modern global world.  This panel examines the distributions and deceptions that could exist within and threaten those connections.  We are particularly interested in examining these breakdowns in relation to the clergy and within church networks. 

For this panel, we welcome papers exploring the tensions between localities, the clergy, bishops, and other authorities as they tried to determine what information was true, what was good intelligence, and whether priests might be acting as informants or foreign agents. At what point did the clergy cross over from being trusted representatives of the church to potentially suspicious foreign agents?  What activities made people suspect that their clergy were not acting in their best interests?  And how did ordinary people evaluate what was true and false and what role did the clergy play in these processes?

We are particularly interested in papers examining Latin American and Central and Eastern European topics.  Potential topics may include but are not limited to:

-          Spies and espionage

-          Church diplomats

-          Suspicious priests/ skeptical parishioners

-          Fake priests

-          Suspicious pilgrims/ travelers

Please submit 150-word abstracts, titles, and 300-word CVs to Amanda Scott (alscott@wustl.edu) and Charles Keenan (charles.keenan@bc.edu) by May 28th.  Feel free to contact us beforehand to discuss your proposal – so long as you are interested at looking at this topic broadly speaking from the perspective of priests and the church, we may be willing to adjust the panel to accommodate you.

 

Tags:  Catholics  diplomats  informants  information networks  news networks  Priests  Protestants  Reformation  spies  suspicious activity 

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Women, Family and Vernacular Letter-Writing in Renaissance Italy

Posted By Deborah Pellegrino, Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Recent years have seen an unprecedented increase in scholarly attention to Renaissance epistolarity and to the practice of letter-writing by women in Renaissance and early modern Italy. This panel invites new contributions on women’s epistolary exchanges in the vernacular form to discuss the central role of wife or/and widow within the family, and more broadly in family relationships and networks across the Italian peninsula in the fifteenth- and sixteenth-centuries. Papers that address this theme and which explore vernacular letter-writing as a quotidian activity for women, connected to family ethics and memory, strategic activity and survival, and which also problematize the mechanism of female and/or maternal agency at work in the role of women as practical collaborators in the social, economic and political life of the Italian family are especially welcome.

 Focusing on these themes, some of the main questions of the panel might include, but are not limited to: What kind of strategies did women elaborate through their family letter-writing to escape or mitigate the rigor of patriarchy? How did wives and/or widows utilize the epistolary medium to both maintain and create ideas about family and household identity, strategy and memory? What was the extent of women's participation inside and outside the family? What kind of literacy and vernacular competencies did women have access to through the family? In what ways did women exploit the epistolary medium’s potential for self-representation and self-fashioning within the family? Were these women concerned with crafting an identity of themselves as a source of family power and knowledge through their epistolary activities?

Submissions should be sent by 28 May to Lisa Di Crescenzo l.dicrescenzo@qmul.ac.uk and Deborah Pellegrino dp1743@nyu.edu, and should include the following information in a separate email attachment:

Please note that the participant must have already been awarded their PhD.

This is a CFP for a panel which will be submitted to The Centre for Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, Queen Mary University of London as a sponsored panel at the RSA 2018 New Orleans.

 

Tags:  Agency  Family  Identity  Letter-writing  Memory  Renaissance Italy  Vernacular  Women 

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Thomas More in history, literature, and theology

Posted By Emily A. Ransom, Wednesday, May 17, 2017

On the heels of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, the International Association for Thomas More Studies is continuing to garner enthusiasm for Thomas More studies among both rising and established scholars at the Renaissance Society of America annual meeting (New Orleans, March 22–24).  Any research relating to Thomas More is invited, including:

  • Utopia (and utopias, law, transatlantic studies, travel literature, satire, etc.)
  • Richard III (and historiography, tyranny, drama, influence on Shakespeare, etc.)
  • The epigrams (and translation, poetic theory, polemics, proverbs, jestbooks, afterlife, etc.)
  • Reformation controversy (and law, ecclesiology, consensus, polemics, rhetoric, biblical translation, Luther, Tyndale, Henry VIII, etc.)
  • Martyrdom (and consolation, devotion, historiography, afterlife, competing literary legacies, Shakespeare’s Book of Thomas More, etc.)

To submit a proposal, please send a 150-word abstract and current CV to Emily Ransom (ransome@uwgb.edu) by June 1.  Proposals will be considered as they come with a fast turn-around time.  Scholars at any stage of their careers are warmly welcome.

Tags:  devotion  Historiography  humanism  martyrdom  poetry  politics  Religion  rhetoric  translation 

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Prophetism and the New World in Early Modern History I

Posted By Marco Volpato, Tuesday, May 16, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Organizers: Marco Volpato and Victor Tiribás

Deadline: 1 June 2017

This panel consists of a series of two sessions concerning the topic of the New World and prophetism in the 16th and 17th centuries. The aim of these sessions is to explore the evolution of the prophetic discourse in the Early Modern period. Emphasis shall also be placed on prophetism as a key element in dealing with the difficulties of fitting the New World into biblical history, linking Christianity and Judaism, millenarianism and messianism. Papers that draw on original sources with an interdisciplinary approach are welcome. For instance, inquisitorial trials, manuscripts and printed documents which circulated in Europe and in the colonies, iconographic materials and theological texts.

The first panel invites papers to discuss aspects of the prophetic discourses on the New World formulated in the 16th century Europe, colonial Indies and Iberian/Mediterranean environment (between Christians, Jews, Moriscos and New Christians).

Papers may focus on (but are not limited to) the following aspects:

  • prophetism and the interpretation of the discovery of the New World;
  • the role of the Indies in the construction of a Providential history;
  • prophetism as a link between the New and the Old World;
  • prophetic and eschatological interpretations of the American Indians and their origins;
  • prophetism in theological-political thoughts and systems, related to concepts like translatio ecclesiae and the dialectics of destruction and renovation;
  • prophetism and global empires.

 

Submissions Guidelines

Submissions should be sent by June 1st 2017 to Marco Volpato (marco.volpato@sns.it) and Victor Tiribás (victor.tiribas@sns.it), and should include the following information:

  • paper title (15 words max)
  • abstract (150 words max)
  • relevant keywords
  • short curriculum vitae (300 words max, NOT in prose form)
  • audiovisual requirements

Tags:  Diasporas  Eschatology  Global Empires  New World  Prophetism  Religious Overlapping 

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Prophetism and the New World in Early Modern History II

Posted By Marco Volpato, Tuesday, May 16, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Organizers: Marco Volpato and Victor Tiribás

Deadline: 1 June 2017

This panel consists of a series of two sessions concerning the topic of the New World and prophetism in the 16th and 17th centuries. The aim of these sessions is to explore the evolution of the prophetic discourse in the Early Modern period. Emphasis shall also be placed on prophetism as a key element in dealing with the difficulties of fitting the New World into biblical history, linking Christianity and Judaismmillenarianism and messianism. Papers that draw on original sources with an interdisciplinary approach are welcome. For instance, inquisitorial trials, manuscripts and printed documents which circulated in Europe and in the colonies, iconographic materials and theological texts.

The second panel invites papers to discuss the consolidation and the effects of the 16th century on the 17th century prophetism, reflecting on its influence on the eschatological meaning of the Diasporas (of Jews, New Christians and Moriscos). For instance, the cases of Pernambuco and Suriname seen as “Colonial Jerusalem”; the re-elaboration of theories on the origins of the American Indians or the rise of innovative exegetical interpretations; the readmission of Jews in Cromwell’s England, led by Menasseh ben Israel; the identification of Portugal as the Fifth Empire by António Vieira and the possibility of making an history of the future”; the emergence of false prophets who were put to trial (or not) by the Inquisition.

Submissions Guidelines

Submissions should be sent by June 1st 2017 to Marco Volpato (marco.volpato@sns.it) and Victor Tiribás (victor.tiribas@sns.it), and should include the following information:

  • paper title (15 words max)
  • abstract (150 words max)
  • relevant keywords
  • short curriculum vitae (300 words max, NOT in prose form)
  • audiovisual requirements

Tags:  Diasporas  eschatology  global empires  New World  prophetism  religious overlapping 

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Violence and the Body in the City: 1300-1650

Posted By Jonathan Davies, Monday, May 15, 2017

‘The Body in the City, 1100-1800’ Focus Program of The Prato Consortium for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (University of Amsterdam, State University of Arizona, University of Edinburgh, University of Toronto, Birkbeck and Queen Mary Colleges at the University of London, Monash University, Warwick University, Archivio di Stato di Prato) is investigating the complex, diverse, and multi-layered realities and understandings of ‘the body’ in medieval and early modern societies. The research program encompasses various disciplines – art, architecture, literature, medicine, politics, religion, gender, society – and focusses on archival, textual, visual and environmental materials.  The geographic focus of the project is Italy, though comparative locations (including the New World) are welcome.

 

The PCMRS will be sponsoring up to three sessions on violence and the body in the city at the Renaissance Society of America Conference for the 2018 annual meeting, to be held in New Orleans next spring, 22-24 March 2018.

In relation to the idea and reality of ‘violence and the body in the city 1300-1650’ topics of interest for submission include, but are not limited to:

-          physical violence

-          verbal violence

-          ritual violence

-          private and public space

-          gender and violence

-          health care

-          justice and punishment

-          representations of violence

 

We welcome abstracts for 20-minute presentations. Please send a 150-word abstract (inclusive of keywords) and a 300-word curriculum vitae to peter.howard@monash.edu by 26 May 2017 (sample CVs are available on the RSA website: http://www.rsa.org/page/submissionguidelines

Tags:  body  gender  health  insult  justice  private/public  punishment  representations  ritual  violence 

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Court Studies Panels

Posted By R. Malcolm Smuts, Monday, May 15, 2017

 

The Society for Court Studies welcomes submissions for panels relating to any aspect of the history of courts and court culture in the early modern period.  Preference will be given to panels that include members of the Society but there is no strict requirement in this respect.  For membership information please see the Society's website at www.courtstudies.org.  Submissions should be sent to Malcolm Smuts at malcolm.smuts@umb.edu; please include all required materials.  To assure that we can notify you in time to allow you to resubmit your panel to the RSA in case we cannot accept it, we ask that you send us your proposal at least ten days before their final deadline. 

This post has not been tagged.

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Early Modern Spanish Scholarship and Mentorship: Papers in Honor of James Amelang

Posted By Jesús Escobar, Monday, May 15, 2017

We seek papers on any topic related to early modern Spanish history and culture for panels that will honor James Amelang on the occasion of his retirement. Professor Amelang’s publications touch upon a range of topics from biographical writing to civic identity to religious conflict, all artfully crafted and meticulously researched. Papers will be grouped thematically, and each panel will have a respondent.

 

Please send proposals to Jesús Escobar (j-escobar@northwestern.edu) and Laura Bass (laura_bass@brown.edu). Include in your proposal: name and affiliation, paper title (max. 15 words), abstract (max. 150 words), and a brief CV (max. 300 words; in ordinary CV format). Email proposals as soon as possible, but no later than May 29, 2017. Applicants will hear whether paper proposal fits in this group submission by June 4, for the RSA submission deadline of June 7, 2017.

Tags:  cultural history  early modern Spain  religious history  urban history 

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