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Literature CFPs for RSA 2018 New Orleans
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This blog is for CFPs for sessions in literature for RSA 2018 New Orleans. Members may post CFPs here: sign in to RSA and select "add new post" to do so. Your post should include a title, and the CFP itself should be no longer than 250 words. Adding tags (key words) to your post will help others find your CFP. Make sure the CFP includes the organizer's name, email address or mail-to link for email address, and a deadline for proposals. Non-members may email rsa@rsa.org to post a CFP. Please use the email address of the session organizer posted in the CFP to submit a paper proposal. CFPs are posted in order of receipt, with the newest postings appearing at the top of the blog. Members may subscribe to the blog to be notified when new CFPs are posted: click on the word Subscribe next to the green checkmark above.

 

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Top tags: Literature  poetry  Early Modern  poetics  history  Renaissance  Art History  drama  Italy  visual culture  Classical Reception  Classics  Early modern Spain  France  Historiography  Latin American Colonial literature  Politics  reception  Religion  Aesthetics  affect  antiquity  book history  England  gender  labor  Latin  magic  materiality  music 

Not Calvinism

Posted By Timothy Rosendale, Thursday, June 1, 2017

In his own time and ours, Calvin's theology been the object of extensive critical attention, but that attention has been uneven in quality and often prone to various sorts of error.  This panel proposes to address misunderstandings, misrepresentations, or well-informed critiques of Calvinism in literature, theology, and (especially) literary criticism.

Please submit paper proposals to Tim Rosendale (trosenda@smu.edu) by 5 June 2017.

Each proposal must include

  • a paper title (15-word maximum)
  • abstract (150-word maximum) abstract guidelines
  • keywords
  • a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). Prose bios will not be accepted.CV guidelines and models
  • first, middle, and last name; affiliation; and email address for all participants

Tags:  England  France  history  Literature  Politics  Religion  theology 

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Petrarch on the Attack: Polemic and Invective

Posted By Maggie Fritz-Morkin, Wednesday, May 31, 2017

This panel proposes to examine the themes, style, sources, and context of Petrarch's polemical works, with the aim of bringing new perspectives on Petrarch's political, autobiographical, and moral motivations.

Papers may address any aspect of Petrarchan polemic. Possible topics include: the aesthetics of vituperation, moral philosophy, classical and medieval sources, curial Avignon as civitas diaboli, Cretan themes and hellish labyrinths, repulsive bodies, poetic license, obscenity, censure and censorship, and attacks on public and private figures.

Presentations may be made in English (the primary language of the RSA) or in Italian. Please submit your paper proposal by June 6, 2017 to Maggie Fritz-Morkin (mfritzm@email.unc.edu) and Teresa Caligiure (teresa.caligiure@uni-hamburg.de)

Proposals should include the following information:

- Name, affiliation, and e-mail address

- Paper title (15-word maximum)

- Abstract (150-word maximum)

- Keywords

- Required A/V equipment

- Brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum)

Tags:  invective  Italy  Petrarch  polemic 

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Final Call for the International Sidney Society

Posted By Robert E. Stillman, Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Call for Papers, RSA 2018.

 

The International Sidney Society invites paper proposals for the RSA (2018) in New Orleans.  Submissions are welcome from new and established scholars working on Philip Sidney, Mary Sidney Herbert, Lady Mary Wroth, or any of the Sidney Family or Sidney Family Circle.  Reading time for papers should be no longer than 20 minutes.

The International Sidney Society plans to sponsor four sessions on the following topics:

 

1.        The Sidneys and Edmund Spenser

2.        The Sidneys and Early Modern Theater

3.        Historical Frames, Poetic Forms, and Aesthetic Pleasures: the Sidneys and

Beauty

4.        Violating Boundaries: Sexuality, Politics, and Religion among the Sidneys

 

 

Submit the following to Robert Stillman (rstillma@utk.edu) no later than May 29th: paper title; abstract (150-word maximum); 3-5 keywords; and a one-page curriculum vitae (300-word maximum).

Tags:  Aesthetics  Politics  Sex  Sidney  Spenser  Theater  Wroth 

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Extended Deadline: Civil War and Strife in Italian Renaissance Epic

Posted By Andrea Moudarres, Monday, May 29, 2017
Updated: Saturday, June 3, 2017

This panel invites papers on the issue of internal conflicts – civil war, feuds, civic discord, vengeance, and post-conflict reconciliation – in Italian Renaissance Epic. We seek proposals that address this topic from a variety of different perspectives and we especially welcome papers that adopt a comparative approach, including studies focused on the Renaissance reception of classical authors such as Lucan and Statius. Sponsored by Italian Literature.

Proposals should include:

-          Title (15 words max.)

-          Abstract (150 words max.)

-          3-5 keywords

-          Short CV (300 words max.)

-          A/V requests

Please review the submission guidelines on the RSA website:

http://rsa.site-ym.com/page/submissionguidelines#

Proposals should be sent to Eleonora Stoppino (stoppino@illinois.edu) and Andrea Moudarres (moudarres@ucla.edu) by June 6, 2017.

Tags:  Classical Reception  epic  Italy  Literature  Political Thought 

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Deadline extended - Building the Early Modern Literary Text

Posted By Katherine L. Brown, Saturday, May 27, 2017
Updated: Saturday, May 27, 2017

The purpose of this session is to examine the role of architecture as a narrative device in early modern literary texts, with emphasis on the impact of Renaissance architectural theory and practice on the discursive function of built environments in the literature of the same time period.  While topical associations between architecture and literature have persisted from classical antiquity through the present day, the evolving conceptualization of architecture in the Renaissance left its mark on the concept of literary creation espoused by early modern writers.  The intellectualization of the architectural profession, the rediscovery of Vitruvian anthropometrics, and the rationalization of urban space may be detected not only in the increasingly realistic depictions of architectural structures in literature, but also in discussions of the relationship between early modern writers and the classical texts they “excavated”, as well as in metaliterary articulations of linguistic and textual “structure”.  As both architecture and literature seek to impose order through processes of logical arrangement, architectural structures described in literary texts may speak to (or pose a challenge to) the notions of textual coherence, conceptual “foundations”, and linguistic representation.

In light of these questions, this panel seeks papers related to the presence and function of architecture in early modern literature, including (but not limited to) the following topics: 1) continuities and differences between medieval and Renaissance uses of architecture as a symbolic discourse in literature; 2) the history of architecture and urban space as reflected in early modern literature; 3) architecture and narrative/poetic structure; 4) architecture and language; 5) architecture and expressions of individual experience.

Please submit your paper proposal by June 2, 2017 to Katherine Brown at katherine.l.brown@yale.edu.  The proposal should include the following information:

§  Name, affiliation, and e-mail address

§  Paper title (15-word maximum)

§  Abstract (150-word maximum) Guidelines

§  Keywords

§  Brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum) Guidelines and models

Tags:  architecture  Colonial Latin America  England  France  Italy  language  literature  poetics  Spain  urban 

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CFP: International Sidney Society (Reminder)

Posted By Robert E. Stillman, Friday, May 26, 2017

Call for Papers, RSA 2018.

 The International Sidney Society invites paper proposals for the RSA (2018) in New Orleans.  Submissions are welcome from new and established scholars working on Philip Sidney, Mary Sidney Herbert, Lady Mary Wroth, or any of the Sidney Family or Sidney Family Circle.  Reading time for papers should be no longer than 20 minutes.

The International Sidney Society plans to sponsor sessions on the following topics:

 1.        The Sidneys and Edmund Spenser

2.        The Sidneys and Early Modern Theater

3.        Historical Frames, Poetic Forms, and Aesthetic Pleasures: the Sidneys/Beauty 

4.        Violating Boundaries: Sexuality, Politics, and Religion among the Sidneys

Please submit the following to Robert Stillman (rstillma@utk.edu) no later than May 29th: paper title; abstract (150-word maximum); 3-5 keywords; and a one-page curriculum vitae (300-word maximum).

Tags:  Mary Sidney Herbert  Mary Wroth  Philip Sidney 

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Rethinking Marvellian Satire

Posted By Laura L. Knoppers, Friday, May 26, 2017
The New Criticism encouraged a focus on Marvell’s lyrics that has drawn attention away from his Restoration satires, which in his own day enjoyed an exponentially larger audience than the poems that remained in manuscript until 1681.  Important work has been and is being done to redress that imbalance, and this panel will include new work that extends and troubles current critical paradigms for understanding Marvell’s satires.  Please send a title, 150-word abstract, 300-word CV, keywords, and A/V requirements to Laura Knoppers (Laura.L.Knoppers.3@nd.edu) by June 5, 2017.

Tags:  Marvell  Restoration  Satire 

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CFP Confraternities In Public and In Private (DEADLINE EXTENDED - 1 JUNE 2017)

Posted By Samantha J. Hughes-Johnson, Thursday, May 25, 2017

The Society for Confraternity Studies will sponsor a number of sessions at the 64th Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America (22 - 24 March 2018) in New Orleans, USA. We invite proposals for papers on the following theme:

 

Confraternities In Public and In Private

 

The term “Janus faced” has been employed to describe the sometimes incongruous nature of confraternal patronage and membership. While confraternities’ public and private life might have contrasted sharply, this did not always end in dissonance. Medieval and Renaissance lay companies the world over routinely consolidated public and private spheres (either consciously or unconsciously) to ensure the continuance of their various operations.  We invite papers that explore the balance and coherence between facets that were seemingly diametrically opposed. Papers might focus on:

 

Visible Activities and Output

·      Cultural productions (artworks, drama, poetry, music, architecture, regalia).

·      Festive nature (pageants, processions, feasting, theatrical tableau, field sports).

·      Use of shared urban spaces for ritual or devotion.

·      Philanthropic relationships with humankind (conspicuous acts of charity, artistic patronage and social auspice).

 

Clandestine Activities

·      Record keeping and other archival practices.

·      Private prayers, meals, meetings, voting and rituals.

·      Inconspicuous acts of charity.

 

Papers must concentrate on confraternal activities between 1400 and 1750 CE and may deal with groups of any race, denomination or faith in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East or Asia. We are particularly interested in papers dealing with Franco-American, Luso-American, Meso-American and slave confraternities.

 

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, academic affiliation, postal address, email, telephone, the paper title (no longer than 15 words), the abstract of the paper (no longer than 150 words), a brief academic C.V. (not longer than 300 words), and a series of key-words that suit the presentation. Please be sure all nine (9) categories of information are clearly provided.

Please submit your proposal to Dr Samantha J.C. Hughes-Johnson at samanthajanecaroline@yahoo.co.uk by 1 June 2017.

 

Tags:  charity.  confraternity  drama  epistles  lay association  philanthropy  piety  poetry  record-keeping  sodality  theatrical tableau 

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Italian Merchant Networks: Language, Culture, Art

Posted By Eleonora Stoppino, Wednesday, May 24, 2017
From the 13th to the 16th century, merchants – especially Italian merchants – were the forerunners of today’s economic systems, but also the promoters of unprecedented cultural networks. By initiating and promoting the circulation of artifacts, ideas, technologies, merchants and their families played a crucial role in shaping culture and its vectors.
We seek papers focused on a multiplicity of aspects of this cultural networks—from language to artistic production, from literature to technology. We particularly welcome papers that probe the validity of traditional definitions of mercantile culture.
 
Proposals should include the following:
-       a paper title (15-word maximum)
-       abstract (150-word maximum) 
-       keywords
-       a very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum). Prose bios will not be accepted. 
-       any scheduling requests.
Please review the submission guidelines on the RSA website: http://rsa.site-ym.com/page/submissionguidelines#
Paper proposals should be sent to Eleonora Stoppino (stoppino@illinois.edu) and Eugenio Refini (erefini1@jhu.edu) by May 31, 2017. 

This post has not been tagged.

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Economies of the Shrine

Posted By Alison K. Frazier, Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Economies of the Shrine

The Hagiography Society is pleased invite papers that explore the ways in which saints’ cults and definitions of sanctity are invariably bound up with money. We welcome a wide and multi-disciplinary variety of perspectives on the economics of cult in global Catholicism: papers might explore how pilgrimage sites generated revenue for religious orders and near-by towns; how artisans received commissions for religious images to encourage pilgrimage; how ex-voto objects fit into the shrine economy; how travel guides supported economic aspects of religious tourism; and how individual entrepreneurs found shrine-related niches. Scholars might also approach the topic from the perspective of the saints, asking how the holy protectors themselves respond to donations, protect treasure and, through visions, uncover lost wealth. 

Send your titled abstract of not more than 150 words by 5 June 2017 to akfrazier@austin.utexas.edu

See further http://rsa.site-ym.com/page/submissionguidelines

 

 

Tags:  economy  miracles  relics  saints 

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